Myopia

Myopia

Myopia or nearsightedness is one of the most common causes of impaired vision. In fact, by 2050 research suggests that nearly half the people on this planet will be myopic. People who have nearsightedness can see close-up objects clearly while distant objects appear blurry. That means that while you may not struggle to read a book or look at a menu, you may struggle to see things farther away like a road sign on the highway. Nearsightedness can affect both adults and children. It is often discovered in children when they are between the ages of 8 and 12. But, myopia can also occur in adults. Typical symptoms of undiagnosed myopia include difficulty seeing things in the distance, as well as squinting.

Eye Floaters

Eye Floaters

Eye floaters are tiny spots in your field of vision. They are small, dark, shadowy shapes that can look like spots, strings, cobwebs, or squiggly lines that seem to drift aimlessly. While they may seem to be in front of your eye, they are actually floating inside of it. Eye floaters are tiny clumps of gel or cells inside the vitreous that fills the eye. The vitreous is a clear gel that fills the space between the lens and the retina of the eye. This gel-like substance helps our eyes retain their round shape. As we age, the vitreous slowly starts to shrink and turn to water. As a result, clumps or strands can form resulting in eye floaters. While most eye floaters are usually not a cause for concern, some can be an indicator that something more serious is happening.

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic eye disease refers to a group of eye problems that affect those with diabetes. Those with diabetes may suffer from diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema, glaucoma, and cataracts. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss among those with diabetes, and it is also the leading cause of blindness. Diabetic eye disease can affect many parts of the eye, including the retina, macula lens and optic nerve. All forms of diabetic eye disease have the potential to cause severe vision loss and blindness, which is why getting an annual eye exam is so important.

Prescription Sunglasses

Prescription Sunglasses

When enjoying the outdoors with family and friends, it can be easy to forget that too much sun exposure can not only damage your skin, but your eyes too. Even on cloudy days, you still need to protect your eyes from the sun. That’s because short-term exposure can lead to temporary sun blindness; and long-term exposure has been linked to age related macular degeneration and cataracts. The truth is, the sun’s rays can cause damage year-round. This means you need to take steps to protect your eyes not just on sunny summer days, but also cloudy days. When purchasing sunglasses, look for ones that block out 100% of both UVA and UVB rays so you can keep your vision sharp and eyes healthy.

Age Related Macular Degeneration

Age Related Macular Degeneration

Age related macular degeneration also known as AMD, is the leading cause of vision loss in people over 60. It is an eye disease that blurs the sharp, central vision you need for activities such as, driving, reading, or writing. This happens when the small central portion of the retina, known as the macula, deteriorates affecting fine detail. For some, AMD advances so slowly, vision loss does not occur for a very long time. In others, the disease advances quickly, and can lead to severe vision loss in one or both eyes.

Astigmatism

Astigmatism

Astigmatism is a common vision condition that causes blurred vision. Like nearsightedness and farsightedness, astigmatism is a refractive error. It is not an eye disease or an eye problem, but rather a condition in which the eye does not focus light precisely on the retina (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye). Characterized by an irregular curvature of the cornea, astigmatism usually is present at birth.

What Are Cataracts

What Are Cataracts

Cataracts are a clouding of the eye’s natural lens, which lies behind the iris and the pupil. They can give the appearance of a cloudy or opaque area in the normally clear lens of the eye. The lens is located inside the eye behind the iris, which is the colored part of the eye. It is what our eyes use to focus light on the retina, which in turn sends the image through the optic nerve to the brain. However, if a cataract clouds the lens, light is scattered so the lens can no longer focus properly, causing vision problems. As the condition progresses, the clouded lens allows less light to pass through your eye, and your vision becomes blurred.

Digital Eye Strain

Digital Eye Strain

Digital eye strain, also referred to as computer vision syndrome, is the physical discomfort that follows after prolonged computer use. Whether it is your desktop, laptop, tablet, or smartphone, many individuals experience eye discomfort and vision problems when viewing digital screens for an extended period of time. As screen time increases at home or in the office, so do symptoms. From dry eyes and headaches, to shoulder and neck pain as well as blurred vision, the extent to which an individual will experience visual symptoms often depends on their level of visual ability and amount of time spent looking at a digital screen.

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that affects the eyes. It is caused by damage to the blood vessels in the tissue at the back of the eye (retina). Anyone with type 1 or type 2 diabetes can develop the condition, as it is often the result of poorly controlled blood sugar. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness affecting all diabetics, and increases the risk of blindness if left untreated.

Retinal Detachment

Retinal Detachment

A retinal detachment can occur at any age and is considered a medical emergency. A detached retina is a serious sight-threating event. In fact, if not treated promptly, a retinal detachment can cause permanent vision loss. The retina is a light sensitive layer of tissue that lines the back of the eyes. When light passes through the eyes, the retina converts it into impulses that travel through the optic nerve to the brain, where they are interpreted as the images we see. Needed for reading, driving, and seeing fine detail, a healthy, intact retina is key to clear vision.