Digital Lens

Digital Lens

A digital lens is to eyeglasses what HD technology was to TV. High-definition lens and digital lens are words used interchangeably to describe eyeglass lenses made using computer controlled surfacing equipment. While traditional eyeglass lenses are made using an abrasive grinding process, a digital lens is manufactured using computer controlled laser technology that is much more precise than conventional tools. In other words, the eyeglass lenses are optimized precisely for your eyes. Although eyeglasses correct vision to 20/20, some people may not be satisfied with how they see.

Eyeglass Lenses

Eyeglass Lenses

For anyone who wears prescription glasses, choosing the right eyeglass lenses is more important than you might think. In fact, it is probably the most important part of the eyewear buying process. Unfortunately, a common mistake people make when choosing their frames, is not spending time to consider the choices of lens materials and treatments offered. Both of which have an impact on how happy you will be with your eyeglasses. So, whether you are an athlete, CEO, or student, buying a pair of glasses is not just about choosing the right frames, it’s also about optimizing your vision.

Presbyopia

Presbyopia

Presbyopia occurs when your eyes gradually lose the ability to focus clearly on objects that are close to you, usually in those over the age of 40. Even if you have never had vision problems, you can still develop presbyopia. That’s because it is a normal part of the aging process. It happens when the lens gradually thickens and loses its flexibility. Just like the rest of your body, as you get older the eyes naturally undergo several changes, and it can become difficult to see things clearly up close or read without eye strain. Age-related farsightedness (presbyopia) at some point, affects everyone. Unfortunately, it is an inevitable part of aging. It cannot be prevented, but it is treatable.

Myopia

Myopia

Myopia or nearsightedness is one of the most common causes of impaired vision. In fact, by 2050 research suggests that nearly half the people on this planet will be myopic. People who have nearsightedness can see close-up objects clearly while distant objects appear blurry. That means that while you may not struggle to read a book or look at a menu, you may struggle to see things farther away like a road sign on the highway. Nearsightedness can affect both adults and children. It is often discovered in children when they are between the ages of 8 and 12. But, myopia can also occur in adults. Typical symptoms of undiagnosed myopia include difficulty seeing things in the distance, as well as squinting.

Eye Floaters

Eye Floaters

Eye floaters are tiny spots in your field of vision. They are small, dark, shadowy shapes that can look like spots, strings, cobwebs, or squiggly lines that seem to drift aimlessly. While they may seem to be in front of your eye, they are actually floating inside of it. Eye floaters are tiny clumps of gel or cells inside the vitreous that fills the eye. The vitreous is a clear gel that fills the space between the lens and the retina of the eye. This gel-like substance helps our eyes retain their round shape. As we age, the vitreous slowly starts to shrink and turn to water. As a result, clumps or strands can form resulting in eye floaters. While most eye floaters are usually not a cause for concern, some can be an indicator that something more serious is happening.

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic eye disease refers to a group of eye problems that affect those with diabetes. Those with diabetes may suffer from diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema, glaucoma, and cataracts. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss among those with diabetes, and it is also the leading cause of blindness. Diabetic eye disease can affect many parts of the eye, including the retina, macula lens and optic nerve. All forms of diabetic eye disease have the potential to cause severe vision loss and blindness, which is why getting an annual eye exam is so important.

Prescription Sunglasses

Prescription Sunglasses

When enjoying the outdoors with family and friends, it can be easy to forget that too much sun exposure can not only damage your skin, but your eyes too. Even on cloudy days, you still need to protect your eyes from the sun. That’s because short-term exposure can lead to temporary sun blindness; and long-term exposure has been linked to age related macular degeneration and cataracts. The truth is, the sun’s rays can cause damage year-round. This means you need to take steps to protect your eyes not just on sunny summer days, but also cloudy days. When purchasing sunglasses, look for ones that block out 100% of both UVA and UVB rays so you can keep your vision sharp and eyes healthy.

Age Related Macular Degeneration

Age Related Macular Degeneration

Age related macular degeneration also known as AMD, is the leading cause of vision loss in people over 60. It is an eye disease that blurs the sharp, central vision you need for activities such as, driving, reading, or writing. This happens when the small central portion of the retina, known as the macula, deteriorates affecting fine detail. For some, AMD advances so slowly, vision loss does not occur for a very long time. In others, the disease advances quickly, and can lead to severe vision loss in one or both eyes.

Astigmatism

Astigmatism

Astigmatism is a common vision condition that causes blurred vision. Like nearsightedness and farsightedness, astigmatism is a refractive error. It is not an eye disease or an eye problem, but rather a condition in which the eye does not focus light precisely on the retina (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye). Characterized by an irregular curvature of the cornea, astigmatism usually is present at birth.

What Are Cataracts

What Are Cataracts

Cataracts are a clouding of the eye’s natural lens, which lies behind the iris and the pupil. They can give the appearance of a cloudy or opaque area in the normally clear lens of the eye. The lens is located inside the eye behind the iris, which is the colored part of the eye. It is what our eyes use to focus light on the retina, which in turn sends the image through the optic nerve to the brain. However, if a cataract clouds the lens, light is scattered so the lens can no longer focus properly, causing vision problems. As the condition progresses, the clouded lens allows less light to pass through your eye, and your vision becomes blurred.